On Monday night, February 27, 2012, 616 men and 7 women resided at the Community at Peachtree Pine.

James Wilson Beaty
Jeremiah 22:16
February 28, 2012

On Saturday night February 25, 2012, 618 men and 6 women resided at The Community at Peachtree Pine. On Sunday night Febuary 26, 2012, 643 men and 8 women resided at the Community at Peachtree Pine.

James Wilson Beaty
Jeremiah 22:16
February 27, 2012

English poet and classical scholar, A. E. Housman, published A SHROPSHIRE LAD in 1896. Housman meticulously arranged the 63 poems to convey the story he wishes to tell. His second poem, II, “Loveliest of Trees” is hailed by critic Louis Untermeyer as “possibly the finest lyric in the English language.” Dr. Joseph Mersand’s notes in Avon’s volume state, “They (these lines) depict the moment when youth, emerging from the strange timelessness of childhood, first grows aware of the lapse of hours, and instinctively reaches out to clasp life’s joys more closely and to live the hurrying moments with a new and trembling intensity.”

II

Loveliest of trees the cherry now
Is hung with bloom along the bough,
And stands about the woodland ride
Wearing white for Eastertide.

Now, of my threescore years and ten,
Twenty will not come again,
And take from seventy springs a score,
It only leaves me ffty more.

And since to look at things bloom
Fifty springs are little room,
About the woodlands I will go
To see the cherry hung with snow.

Note: Dr. Mersand’s “hurrying moments” bring to mind Andrew Marvell’s, “And at my back I always hear time’s winged chariots hurrying near.” Then Tennyson’s “Ulysses” helps us “clasp life’s joys more closely” with his instruction to “drink life to the lees.”

James Wilson Beaty
Jeremiah 22:16
February 25, 2012

On Friday night, February 24, 2012, 622 men and 8 women resided at The Community at Peachtree Pine.

James Wilson Beaty
Jeremiah 22, 16
February 25, 2012

On Thursday night the Community at Peachtree Pine housed 599 men and 9 women.

James Wilson Beaty
Jeremiah 22:16
February 24, 2012

Feb 23, 2012 IN THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE 11TH DISTRICT

METRO ATLANTA TASK FORCE FOR THE HOMELESS, INC.

VERSUS

THE CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA

ON APPEAL FROM THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF GEORGIA

FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF GEORGIA

THE APPELLANT’S MOTION TO REINSTATE THE APPEAL IS: GRANTED.

James Wilson Beaty
Jeremiah 22:16
February 23, 2012

In his book, GENIUS, Harold Bloom, critic par excellence, writes, “After Shakespeare and Chaucer, Dickens vies with Jane Austen as the peopler of the world. It is all the better that so many of Dickens people are grotesques: look around you.” (p. 777, Warner Books) One of Dickens’grotesque people that he created from his own experience is Schoolmaster Creakle. In my recent blog entitled, “Dickens And The Law,” I pointed out that Creakle was appointed to the level of Middlesex Magistrate, no longer a schoolmaster.

As magistrate, Creakle writes to David Copperfield, a former student in his school. Copperfield has acquired some notoriety as a writer, thus the invitation from Magistrate Creakle to visit his prison. Dickens writes of the purpose of the visit to Creakle’s prison. Copperfield speaks to his lawyer friend, Thomas Traddles. Both attended Creakles’ school. “On the commission he is, at any rate,” said I. “And he writes to me, here, that he will be glad to show me, in operation, the only true system of prison discipline, the only unchallengeable way of making sincere and lasting converts and penitents – – which, you know, is by solitary confinement.”

Five lines later David Copperfield speaks of Creakle’s behavior as a magistrate, “Yet , if you’ll read his letter, you’ll find he is the tenderest of men to prisoners convicted of the whole calendar of felonies,” said I, “though I can’t find that his tenderness extends to any other class of created beings.”

Note: Don’t you love Harold Bloom’s, “look around you”?

James Wilson Beaty
Jeremiah 22:16
February 23, 2012